Cavitation

Cavitation

By kennbmondo | MondoWorks | 27 Feb 2019


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Cavitation is the formation and then immediate implosion of cavities in a liquid – i.e. small liquid-free zones (“bubbles”) – that are the consequence of forces acting upon the liquid. It usually occurs when a liquid is subjected to rapid changes of pressure that cause the formation of cavities where the pressure is relatively low.

Bubble fusion, also known as sonofusion, is the non-technical name for a nuclear fusion reaction hypothesized to occur during a high-pressure version of sonoluminescence, an extreme form of acoustic cavitation. Officially, this reaction is termed acoustic inertial confinement fusion (AICF) (see ICF) since the inertia of the collapsing bubble wall confines the energy, causing an extreme rise in temperature. The high temperatures that sonoluminescence can produce raise the possibility that it might be a means to achieve thermonuclear fusion.

Sono-Fusion covers a wide range of hypotheses and experimental data conducive of the idea that ultrasonic cavitation in liquids (from water to liquid metals) may interfere with nuclear chemistry due to not yet well understood exotic processes happening at high temperatures and pressure in and around collapsing bubbles inside the liquid. The focus of sono-fusion has been mainly about reaching the fusion of deuterium nuclei through ultrasonic cavitation.  *Wikipedia

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kennbmondo

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