(Female) Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus)

By AF3LMike | af3l_mike | 6 Apr 2019


Today I went hiking with a friend looking for migrating spring birds coming back north. We were visiting Nescopeck State Park in Drums, Pennsylvania and saw they had bird feeders out behind the visitor's center. We decided to stop at the bird feeders to see what type of birds were there feeding. Nothing unusual until I spotted a larger bird fly into a pine tree about 30ft away from me. To our surprise, it was a female Evening Grosbeak. Evening Grosbeaks are not a common bird to find here in my part of Pennsylvania. We waited the bird out for about 1 1/2 hrs and finally she came out into the open where we could photograph her. This was exciting for me because this is a new bird for me to photograph and confirm. Here are the photos of the female Evening Grosbeak

 

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Some cool facts about the Evening Grosbeak are provided by "The Cornell Lab of Ornithology" website

 

1. The Evening Grosbeak is a songbird without a song—that is, it does not seem to use any complex sounds to attract a mate or defend its territory. It does have a small repertoire of simple calls, including sweet, piercing notes and burry chirps

2. With their enormous bills, Evening Grosbeaks can crush seeds that are too large for Common Redpolls and Pine Siskins to open. These smaller birds often seek out the grosbeaks and glean the food scraps they leave behind

3. Though they’re ferocious seed-crackers in the wintertime, in summer Evening Grosbeaks eat insects such as spruce budworm, a serious forest pest. The grosbeaks are so adept at finding these tiny caterpillars that the birds often provide a first warning that a budworm outbreak has begun

4. In the mid-1800s, Evening Grosbeaks were uncommon to rare east of the Rockies, but then they began moving eastward with each winter migration, reaching Rhode Island in the winter of 1910–1911. By the 1920s they were considered a regular winter visitor in New England. This eastward expansion may be related to the growing number of ornamental box elders, which provide a steady food supply for the grosbeaks

5. Evening Grosbeaks are irregular (or “irruptive”) winter migrants. Some years these spectacular finches show up at feeders far south of their normal winter range—providing a treat for backyard bird watchers. By joining Project FeederWatch you can keep track of visits by these and other winter birds—and the data you record will help scientists keep track of bird populations

6. The oldest recorded Evening Grosbeak was a male, and at least 16 years, 3 months old when he was found in New Brunswick in 1974. He had been banded in Connecticut in 1959

 

 

My camera equipment:

Canon EOS 60D body

Canon EF-S 18-135mmf/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

Sigma 150-500mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM for Canon EF mount

Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di Vc USD Lens for Canon

All photos are handshot, no tripod

Thanks everyone for taking the time to read this post. Have a great day/night wherever you may be

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AF3LMike
AF3LMike

My name is Michael from Pennsylvania, U.S.A. I am 47 yrs old and have created this blog for my passion of bird, other wildlife, landscape photography, basically anything that captures my interest with a camera. I hope you enjoy what I post


af3l_mike
af3l_mike

My name is Michael from Pennsylvania, U.S.A. I am 47 yrs old and have created this blog for my passion of bird, other wildlife, landscape photography and basically anything that captures my interest with a camera. I hope you enjoy what I post

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