Sirwin
Sirwin

Nostalgia For Valhalla - Chapter 2

By RTBreach | R.T. Breach | 30 Jan 2023


“What the hell happened?” Keshav, the Divine and Holy One, leaned up on one elbow from the gel bed cradling his naked, dark brown body. “Magos. Hey, what’s going on?”

Focused audio transducers beamed a reply straight at Keshav’s ears. “I’m not sure, your Worship. The connection was rock solid. Everything should’ve worked. Excellency, you’re sure you see nothing?”

Keshav, two and a half meters tall, built like a prime conditioned heavyweight fighter, heaved a sigh. “Yes, I’m sure. I felt it, though.” He contemplated his empty hand a moment before swinging both legs over the conforming gel bed edge and sitting up. Tucked away in stasis to play out a fantasy of living like the old ones in another universe; postponed. Planting both feet into slippers neatly placed by the bed, he stood.

“A spacial anomaly caused a brane distortion,” Magos said. “Based on measurements during development, a surge in the Quantum Transition Regulator bias ultimately triggered a connection abortion.”

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Keshav stalked out of the stasis room, snatching a black, calf-length bathrobe from a wall hook as he passed. Damned computers. What the hell could’ve gone wrong? All the years, all the energy, and all the sleepless nights-- Okay, I never sleep, but I feel like I lost a lot of sleep.

The stasis room door hinged open at his approach. Cinching the cloth belt on his robe, Keshav paused at the door’s frame. A finger unconsciously rose to tap his lips. Maybe there’s a flaw in the Quantum Bore Tubes? He rubbed his face with both hands. “Blazes! I don’t know.”

He passed into a brightly lit room filled with blinking computer blocks and neatly snaked superconductors. A central desk and interface chair sat empty. Plopping down into the chair, he surveyed the on-screen data. “Looks like there’s still a connection. Magos, see if you can--”

“Already tried it,” Magos interjected, “and eleven other possibilities.”

Keshav clucked his tongue. “Did anything work or show promise? Throw me a bone here.”

“Preliminary data analysis indicates the anomaly initiated on the avatar’s end.”

“The avatar? That makes little sense.” Keshav sawed at his chin.

“Yes, the more I analyze, the more it becomes clear; the avatar fell unconscious at the moment of synchronization.”

Leaning back, Keshav said, “Hit me with it. I want to see for myself.”

“As you wish, Excellency. Standby.”

Keshav sucked in a breath, held it, and opened his eyes wide. His body clenched as mountains of data transferred straight into his hyper-brain. The data stream terminated. His shoulders slumped. “Oh, yeah, that’s the stuff.” Sitting bolt up, he bellowed, “Woo-hoo!” He took a second to review the information. “Okay, what are you—okay, I see the anomaly too. Yeah, there it is. It looks like the avatar activated too early.” Gazing at the ceiling with a frown, he said, “Somewhere, in another universe, my avatar is running around without me.”

“I’m sorry, your Worship. I know you were looking forward to your adventure.”

“Reminds me of an ancient tale called Frankenstein.”

“Good observation, your Worship. This is a horror story for someone else.”

Nestled on the desk; two circular, recessed silver pads, each about twenty centimeters in diameter. Keshav, with a disgusted raspberry, placed both hands on the data entry pads. His touch lit the outer rims with white light. A three-meter by three-meter video hologram materialized above and in front. Seconds later, a red circle appeared center of the screen. The ring gradually turned white and disappeared. Readouts appeared, lining the edge of the view. Speed, location, temperature; all showed dashes instead of digits. Keshav laced fingers behind his head and leaned back, brow furrowed. Very intriguing development. All the protocols and simulations showed the trans-universe portal was stable. Looking at this data, it appears to be secure and functional.

Magos produced more than enough energy, encompassing an ‘M’ class star in a Dyson sphere. Months of fine-tuning and retests finally opened a stable wormhole linking a parallel universe. Next, the one hundred million kilometer diameter Magos calibrated the injection modulator while Keshav prepared a transponder test unit. Not only did the transponder survive the journey intact, it still functioned.

Hoping their discovery meant a person could travel through wormholes, Keshav and Magos slaughtered hundreds of test subjects, concluding this is not the case; death assured if one enters a wormhole. Thinking outside the box, Keshav worked out a principle: inanimate and non-living things could survive the trip. What if a machine constructed a living being? One capable of being controlled remotely.

“Exalted One, look at the telemetry.”

Heaving a sigh, he scanned columns of numbers scrolling up the screen. Slowly, Keshav sat up straight. “It’s working. I mean, the avatar still functions. It’s moving around. What’s it doing?”

The solar system-sized AI replied, “I don’t know. Without sync, it should have remained inert. My apologies, your worship. This hasn’t happened before, so I’m in unfamiliar territory.”

Keshav brought a hand to his mouth, dragging it down to his chin. “Blazes. Do you think it’s something to worry about?”

“Well, since it’s in a parallel universe, we shouldn’t have anything to be concerned about.”

“Shouldn’t?”

“It’s unlikely the avatar will ever figure out wormholes any time soon. Short of opening one leading here, we’ll never have contact with the avatar in real life again.”

Sitting back down, Keshav said, “So you think it’ll deactivate soon?”

“I think it’s irrelevant. There isn’t enough time left in the universe for the avatar to figure out fusion energy and space-time bridges.”

Keshav leaned in the chair, elbows on armrests, hands together with forefingers pointed. After tapping his lips a few times with the fingers of his clasped hands, he said, “You’re right, of course. We well equipped the avatar to deal with any situation. Its internal power source will last thousands of years. The avatar just doesn’t know its potential. Luckily.”

Magos didn’t immediately respond. “Sovereign One, you’re making me paranoid.”

“Rightly so. Leave it to you, coming up with a plausible worst-case scenario. However, I doubt it will last long enough. The thing will drown or fall off a cliff. Hell, the humans of the era were a bunch of violent barbarians. It’ll never make it past two years.” Keshav rose and linked hands behind his back, eyeing the holographic images in silence. “I’m supposed to be riding the avatar as we speak. Living among ancient humanity like original humans did thousands of years ago. That’s all I wanted. A vacation where I can take over the world. There’s only one thing to do: send another Genesis device.”

“I was hoping you wouldn’t say that, Sire.” If the gargantuan robot could, it would’ve pouted. “The previous one took six months of subatomic construction. I don't know if I'm ready to do that. It was a draining endeavor. And I’m behind on deity duties.”

Keshav, nodding, turned from the screen and strolled back to the stasis room, where he awoke earlier.

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The disembodied voice of Magos asked, “Excellency, what are you thinking?”

“I’m not sure.” Keshav stood in front of the bed, hands resting on the thin pad of cushion. He gripped the bed pad hard for a few seconds. “All I know is I’m not giving up easily. You’ll have to suck it up. We’ll monitor this avatar. Maybe we can override it while we make a new one. We’ll send it through, I’ll sync, and then I’ll end our rogue avatar. Problem solved. The dumb thing will probably get itself killed by the locals, anyway.”

“Or a bear.”

“Yes, or a wild animal will end it. One way or the other, I want to live like an original human. Be part of the land and fauna. There’s no option, Mags. We build another cylinder and try again.”

Committed to its God, Magos agreed. “As you wish, your Worship. I still don’t see what the big deal is about roughing it—living without electricity even.” Magos sighed. “I’ll fire up the atomic printer and crank out another. It’ll be a few weeks. Maybe a month.”

The man spun and marched through the door. “Okay, keep me posted. I’ll be in the simulator.”

“Studying clone construction?”

Snorting a laugh, Keshav replied, “No. I’m going to practice melee combat. I’ll need to be ready in case the avatar discovers its true potential.”

“Could it become self-aware?”

“If the avatar gets curious about the heads-up display data in its field of view all the time, it might figure something out. Nobody in that parallel universe will have a clue what it’s talking about.” As he passed through to the simulation chamber, he said over his shoulder, “I don’t know what it’ll do.”

 

Stay tuned for the next installment!

Other books by R.T. Breach:
Operation Palmetto
Operation Watchtower
Operation Blue Eagle
Operation Raven Rock

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RTBreach
RTBreach

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R.T. Breach
R.T. Breach

I'm an author of sci-fi and thriller stories. It will be a mixed bag of short stories and series chapters. I hope you like adventure and enjoy the reads!

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