Sirwin
Sirwin
Documenting a host of fungi that found on old, rotting logs in the woods, including a few that were brand new to me

Mushroom Monday - Multiple Rare Finds On One Log

By tych0_21 | MyMycoBlog | 14 Mar 2023


Winter is not typically the season when I expect to come across a wide variety of fungi while out on my walks through the woods, but I was pleasantly surprised this weekend while making my way along my favorite local trail. About half way through my walk, I decided on a whim to push through a particularly dense section of thicket to access a section of my local woods that I had not yet explored. I had thought to explore in this area before, but the thick foliage was virtually impenetrable during the spring and summer months when I had last considered doing so. With the forest much more open after months of winter, there was no better time then now to give it a shot.

After climbing through a dense tangle of grapevines, I made my way to small inland lake surrounded on all sides by towering old oaks and a forest floor littering with dozens of old, rotting logs. I made my way down to the lake, still partially frozen from the cold, to inspect a particularly large felled log by the water's edge. As I inspected the log root to tip, I came across a variety of fungi all feasting on the same felled tree, several of them being species that I had never come across before until that day. My favorite find of the group was a small cluster of fungi that I first mistook for a small swarm of beetles: Angelina rufescens. While I had seen a few photos of this delicate Ascomycete before, this was my first time coming face to face with it in the wild. Accompanying it on the same log only inches away was propolis farinosa, another delicate, minute ascomycete that, unlike the dark blue-black hue of Agelina rufescens, displayed a brilliantly white fertile surface. A few other species that I found adorning the same log and its neighbors included Perenniporia ohiensisBotryobasidium simileGanoderma lobatum, Dog's Nose Fungus (Camarops petersii), Oak Curtain Crust Fungus (Hymenochaete rubiginosa), and Rosy Crust (Peniophora incarnata), all relatively uncommon species in my region of the woods.

I can't wait to come back in the spring to find whatever other treasures this spot may be hiding. I'll be sure to bring my machete next time to make it back through!

I hope that you enjoy these picture of the fungi I found both down by the lake as well as on the remainder of my hike. Happy mushroom Monday to you all!

Angelina rufescens:

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Propolis farinosa:

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Perenniporia ohiensis:

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Ganoderma lobatum:

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Botryobasidium simile:

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Dog's Nose Fungus (Camarops petersii):

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Rosy Crust (Peniophora incarnata):

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Oak Curtain Crust Fungus (Hymenochaete rubiginosa):

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Honeydew Eater (Scorias spongiosa):

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Black Knot (Apiosporina morbosa):

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American Amber Jelly Fungus (Exidia crenata):

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Ceramic Parchment (Xylobolus frustulatus):

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Velvet Foot (Flammulina velutipes):

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Violet-toothed Polypore (Trichaptum biforme):

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Clustered Bonnet (Mycena inclinata):

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tych0_21
tych0_21

Amateur mycologist and botanist exploring the natural world around me


MyMycoBlog
MyMycoBlog

Mycology, Botany, and nature-appreciation

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