Sirwin
Sirwin

Evidence-Based Public Health to Inform Decisions about COVID-19 Treatment


COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus, acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Although COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory infection, increasing data indicate the potential for systemic involvement in patients with the disease, including cardiovascular, neurological, and dermatologic manifestations. The pathophysiological course of COVID-19 is proposed to involve three distinct phases. In the early stages of infection, the SARS-CoV-2 virus enters epithelial cells in the nasal cavity and multiplies in the upper part of the lung with or without lung involvement. The second stage is characterized by localized lung inflammation and the development of viral pneumonia with or without hypoxia. In a minority of patients, the disease progresses to the third stage, manifesting as another pulmonary systemic hyperinflammatory syndrome with a high level of proinflammatory cytokines and potential thrombotic complications. Growing awareness of the pathogens involved in COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of selecting and implementing stage-appropriate treatments. Since its inception, the worldwide effort to validate effective therapeutic interventions for COVID-19 has resulted in the identification of many potential candidates and the initiation of thousands of clinical trials of various therapies. In addition, several clinical trials are currently underway to assess the effects of various potential therapies for COVID-19. The large amount of data obtained from these studies should be rapidly interpreted so that emergency and critical care physicians have the information to make appropriate treatment decisions and, if effective treatments are available, to rapidly implement them into clinical practice. In addition, getting a quick answer to the question of whether a particular intervention is effective can help researchers involved in the many ongoing clinical trials shift their focus and focus to more promising options. As many emergencies and critical care physicians are currently using compassionate care exemptions or off-label prescription-based therapies to treat patients with COVID-19, it is important that they have access to the most recent research evidence available to them. To address this evidence gap, international and local EBPH partnerships between researchers, educators, clinicians, public health professionals, and policymakers are needed to provide the latest evidence on the best available treatment options for COVID-19. This information allows frontline healthcare providers to navigate the deluge of relevant data and ensure that treatment for COVID-19 is based on the best available knowledge at the individual and population levels. However, until clinicians evaluate the validity and clinical applicability of research findings, evidence alone is insufficient to make appropriate treatment decisions. Therefore, emergency and critical care clinicians should understand the evidence-based practice, such as formulating clinical questions, searching for evidence, critically evaluating evidence, and applying it to practice.

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Delelegn Emwodew
Delelegn Emwodew

I am a health system researcher with strong interest in implementation science research, digital health and health technologies. I have published more than 15 scientific papers in peer-reviewed international journals.


EBPH in COVID-19 Affected Humanitarian Settings
EBPH in COVID-19 Affected Humanitarian Settings

The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the importance of updating global evidence-based guidelines to address context-specific and emerging needs in humanitarian settings. This blog discusses the role of evidence-based public health practice in addressing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in humanitarian settings.

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